I am a born Texan with severe curiosity. General medicine excites me. Science of any kind intrigues me. Here, I can at least keep up with my finds.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from medicalschool  242 notes
medicalschool:

Doxorubicin is a drug used in cancer chemotherapy. it works by intercalating DNA, with the most serious adverse effect being life-threatening heart damage. It is commonly used in the treatment of a wide range of cancers. Doxorubicin is commonly used to treat some leukemias and Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as cancers of the bladder, breast, stomach, lung, ovaries, thyroid, soft tissue sarcoma, multiple myeloma, and others. The most dangerous side effect of doxorubicin is cardiomyopathy, leading to congestive heart failure. The incidence of this cardiomyopathy is dependent on its cumulative dose. There are several ways in which doxorubicin is believed to cause cardiomyopathy, including oxidative stress, downregulation of genes for contractile proteins, and p53 mediated apoptosis.

medicalschool:

Doxorubicin is a drug used in cancer chemotherapy. it works by intercalating DNA, with the most serious adverse effect being life-threatening heart damage. It is commonly used in the treatment of a wide range of cancers. Doxorubicin is commonly used to treat some leukemias and Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as cancers of the bladder, breast, stomach, lung, ovaries, thyroid, soft tissue sarcoma, multiple myeloma, and others. The most dangerous side effect of doxorubicin is cardiomyopathy, leading to congestive heart failure. The incidence of this cardiomyopathy is dependent on its cumulative dose. There are several ways in which doxorubicin is believed to cause cardiomyopathy, including oxidative stress, downregulation of genes for contractile proteins, and p53 mediated apoptosis.

Reblogged from lelosa  84,370 notes

sixpenceee:

Déjà Vu

Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself.

The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.

Déjà Vécu

Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu.

Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 

Déjà Visité

Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 

Déjà Senti

Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.

You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.

Jamais Vu

Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.

Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.

Presque Vu

Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 

L’esprit de l’Escalier

L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 

Capgras Delusion

Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.

Fregoli Delusion

Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.

It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.

Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.

SOURCE

Reblogged from scienceyoucanlove  2,656 notes
scienceyoucanlove:

Meet Zed Merrick, a two-year-old whose second degree burns were healed with the Spray-On Skin treatment A toddler who suffered horrific burns has made a full recovery after undergoing pioneering new surgery - where doctors sprayed on a new layer of skin. Two-year-old Zed Merrick was left with second degree burns across this chest and shoulder after knocking a cup of tea off a kitchen worktop.Doctors carried out a “revolutionary” new treatment where they made a solution from Zed’s own skin cells and sprayed it over his burns. And just four months after the life-changing treatment Zed’s burns have completely disappeared - leaving him scar free.Spray-on skin is a patented skin culturing treatment for burns victims, developed by scientist Marie Stoner and plastic surgeon Dr Fiona Wood of Perth, Western Australia. Wood’s treatment is under ongoing development. Where previous techniques of skin culturing required 21 days to produce enough cells to cover major burns, Wood has reduced the period to five days. Through research, she found that scarring is greatly reduced if replacement skin could be provided within 10 days. Dr Wood’s reported goal is “scarless woundless healing”.Read more: http://huff.to/1tnLdQR
text source

scienceyoucanlove:

Meet Zed Merrick, a two-year-old whose second degree burns were healed with the Spray-On Skin treatment 

A toddler who suffered horrific burns has made a full recovery after undergoing pioneering new surgery - where doctors sprayed on a new layer of skin. Two-year-old Zed Merrick was left with second degree burns across this chest and shoulder after knocking a cup of tea off a kitchen worktop.

Doctors carried out a “revolutionary” new treatment where they made a solution from Zed’s own skin cells and sprayed it over his burns. And just four months after the life-changing treatment Zed’s burns have completely disappeared - leaving him scar free.

Spray-on skin is a patented skin culturing treatment for burns victims, developed by scientist Marie Stoner and plastic surgeon Dr Fiona Wood of Perth, Western Australia. Wood’s treatment is under ongoing development. Where previous techniques of skin culturing required 21 days to produce enough cells to cover major burns, Wood has reduced the period to five days. Through research, she found that scarring is greatly reduced if replacement skin could be provided within 10 days. Dr Wood’s reported goal is “scarless woundless healing”.

Read more: http://huff.to/1tnLdQR

text source

Reblogged from ragincontagion  264 notes
ragincontagion:

A Colles’ fracture is a fracture of the distal radius bone above the radio-carpal joint without involvement of the ulnar bone resulting in a posterior and radial displacement of the hand. It’s usually the result of someone trying to break a fall on their outstretched arm and has a high prevalence among patients with osteoporosis.

ragincontagion:

Colles’ fracture is a fracture of the distal radius bone above the radio-carpal joint without involvement of the ulnar bone resulting in a posterior and radial displacement of the hand. It’s usually the result of someone trying to break a fall on their outstretched arm and has a high prevalence among patients with osteoporosis.

Reblogged from scienceyoucanlove  456 notes
corporisfabrica:

The ingestion of barium (a contrast medium) as imaged with fluoroscopy.
A specialised radiographic technique, fluoroscopy allows the production of moving images through x-rays. Here, the action of swallowing is visualised: barium appears black due to its high density (and therefore high absorption of incident x-rays) compared with surrounding structures. 

corporisfabrica:

The ingestion of barium (a contrast medium) as imaged with fluoroscopy.

A specialised radiographic technique, fluoroscopy allows the production of moving images through x-rays. Here, the action of swallowing is visualised: barium appears black due to its high density (and therefore high absorption of incident x-rays) compared with surrounding structures.